Stories from the 1940s

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How It Feels to Make One's First Beginnings in A. A. Harry I. of the New York A.A. is up here at the farm. Seeing he is here for two days, I am pumping him for all I can get out of him on A.A. He has opened my eyes to a lot I never knew. You would be surprised how I have gotten over resentments of... Joe November 1944
How It Feels to Make One's First Beginnings in A. A. Felt fine, but tired. Up too late. Did bills, called M. and got set for A.A. lunch. More bills--more and more nervous till I decided I was too shy to go to lunch alone. Relaxed and finished bills. Dressed. Lunch at Pierre --4 glasses (big) of... Steve November 1944
How It Feels to Make One's First Beginnings in A. A. I was in my 60th year when I first contacted A.A. I had always been a steady and heavy drinker. Having what drinks I wanted was as much a natural part of my life as smoking. So far as I was able to tell at that time it had never interfered with my... Elliot B. November 1944
How It Feels to Join A. A. Long Before You Have to It was a lovely spring morning last June, warm and full of promise--a day that fills you with love of life and a desire to live it fully, to accomplish all the things you have dreamed, to work, to love your fellow man. It was the first day of my... Beatrice November 1944
Do You Know: By the time most of us have reached A.A., we have suffered and, contrary to our expectations, have survived many hangovers. This happy and surprising turn of events is seldom due to the magic potency of advertised nostrums. Nor to the "infallible... An Anonymous Doctor November 1944
A Father Looks Through His Son's Eyes If we non-alcoholics, who have seen this alcoholic disease take possession of one who is dear to us, could change places with the alcoholic and through his eyes get his outlook on life, I believe we would be appalled. If we could feel ourselves... Bill S.'s father, Wally December 1944
The Children Say What A.A. Means to Them Six years ago my father called my brother and me into the living room to give us one of his few and scattered "lectures." However, the contents of his dreaded speech were far from what we expected. They were, in fact, a confession and a pledge to us... Bert T.'s 18-year-old son, Alan December 1944
The Children Say What A.A. Means to Them The first time I encountered Mother under the influence of liquor (and I do mean influence), I was rather taken aback by the surprised shock I received at discovering her in such a stew. I had heard vaguely of people getting drunk, but never had I... Felicia G.'s 17-year-old daughter, December 1944
The Children Say What A.A. Means to Them I am an alcoholic's daughter. I think what I missed most in my childhood was a feeling of security. A child needs to feel that home is always the same, always a place to bring friends and always a place of strength on which she can rely. Her father... Ed F.'s 18-year-old daughter, Joan December 1944
The Children Say What A.A. Means to Them Two years ago, Alcoholics Anonymous didn't mean a thing to me. Now, A.A. means the fulfillment of countless prayers, the assurance of family life, and most of all, freedom from doubt and suspicion inside the home. Before its appearance on the scene... Marian M.'s 16-year-old son, Peter December 1944