Burning Desire to Share

2030 replies [Last post]
AD010416
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Joined: 2012-01-18
Re: is a desire to stop judging others

Based on that reasoning, I'm not an alcoholic, because my brother and two sisters weren't alcoholics.
My opinion? Keep speaking out about know-nothings trying to tell alcoholics how to stay sober. We get enough of their steer manure from the treatment industry.
I'd also think about getting a new sponsor, one who is familiar with our Traditions. It's bad enough when the group allows that sort of trash, but to say it's your problem is a downright lie.

Anonymous
Re: is a desire to stop judging others

Thanks for your thoughts. I don't want to be a controversial figure in my group but, I just can't accept this. As you suggested, I ended my relationship with my sponsor and hope to find another soon as well as a new group. I know I was a jerk for speaking out but, my heart is not going to budge on that issue at this time.

Anonymous
Thank G.O.D for alcoholics

Thank G.O.D for alcoholics anonymous I'm grateful for my recovery and I know A.A does not need me but I need A.A

Anonymous
jerk, not!

We do not wish to engage in any controversy. That means
public controversy. We ought to avoid controversy at
the meeting itself. But the second tradition is built
on differences of opinions and certainly controversy.
Bill W. called them squabbles, and hopefully we will
always have them. We have a common goal: to make A.A.
as effective as possible. We do not all agree on how
best to do that. On second thought, maybe you are a
jerk for walking away from the group, instead of trying
to repair a fixable problem. As far as the change of sponsors, I firmly believe that today's concept of
"sponsor" ought to be deleted from our A.A. vocabulary.
If we do that then the real sponsor or mentor will
reappear. ANONYMOUS

Anonymous
Bad Advice -Medication

A member of our group was struggling with depression. After three years he finally got professional help. Members of our group were against him taking medication. They said he was depressed because he wasn't working the steps hard enough and that he wasn't being honest with his higher power. They also said he wasn't really sober and had a cheaters sobriety. People treated him as a "loser." I was against this and encouraged him to listen to the doctors. I reminded people at a group conscious that it is not appropriate to give medical advice. I believe people who are against taking medication are the people who need it the most. It is common knowledge that mental illness is very common with alcoholics. Just working the steps and praying does not work for everyone. So to cut to the quick, he started taking medication as prescribed and his life turned around. Unfortunately, members of our group kept working on him until they convinced him to stop taking the medication. As one would guess where this is leading to, he blew his brains out. I was the only member of our group to attend the funeral service. This is not the first time it has happened in my group. I have two questions; "How perfect does one have to work the steps and pray to have their higher power cure them of mental illness? Is sobriety only rewarded to those members that are perfect?"

amazon5
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Joined: 2012-09-19
Medication

I take strong exception to anyone telling another person what medication they can and cannot take. As a health professional in AA I have a seen many who have both an addiction to alcohol and major depression requiring medication. A good friend of mine who is now sober for 30 years in AA is an example of this. He works a great program, as evidenced by his continued sobriety, AND has had lifelong depression often requiring medication. He knows that he cannot live a healthy, joyful live without medical treatment because he has tried. No amount of good AA took away his depression even at 25 years sober.
Depression and other mental illnesses exist separately from alcoholism. Sure it can take a variable amount of time during the first months/years of sobriety for the effects of alcohol to clear from the brain but once they do we all have periods of happiness. People with depression do not have this happiness and they are at risk for suicide if left untreated.

Anonymous
re: alcoholism and other medications

You need to find a different group. There is a pamphlet on the aa.org website that covers this topic. Anyone telling another member what medications they should or should not be taking is a danger to others. I am sorry, but bipolar disorder does not resolve itself through prayer any more than hypertension, diabetes, and hepatitus do.

Anonymous
re: alcoholism and other medications

To the previous posts...Thanks for all the support. I've left the group and a good men's discussion meeting was recommended. I was told the members of the group do not say stupid things about medication and doctors. He also mentioned that the founder of AA struggled with depression throughout his recovery and tried various things to relieve the pain which is seldom acknowledged or talked about.
If the guy in my group who ended his life would of known that about the founder it could of made a difference and maybe he would of not ended his life. Shawn R.

Anonymous
depression

Yes Bill did suffer from depression a long time he overcame his by practicing the 11th step he found out that he was wanting to be at the top of the heap or he would sank to the bottom of the heap when he didn't get what he wanted his solution was to quit playing God you can't rely on God and defy him at the same time, you can find this in the book Pass it on a story of Bill W.'s life.

Anonymous
re-depression

It is common knowledge Bill W. was not a saint. One does not have to be a saint to start a spiritual program. We like to think our fearless leader was angelic; perhaps this awareness might comfort us. However, if anyone was a saint it would be Lois is faithful wife who endured much embarrassment and humiliation. Bill suffered from depressions, rage, a large ego and indiscretions with women while married. Bill could not give up his nicotine addiction. His chain smoking led him to emphysema inside an oxygen tank where he kept smoking and finally he lay dying screaming uncontrollably for a drink as documented by the nursing staff. Despite these imperfections, I find a man I admire much. He was an ordinary man who sincerely cared for the suffering alcoholic throughout his life. He never quit but kept searching. He even experimented with LSD and niacin in order to find a cure. Today, if Bill were still alive he would be working with doctors and medical scientists to find the correct healing agent for alcoholism. Bill was human and in his humanness I’ve grown to appreciate him. I’ve learned to accept myself for not being perfect. Knowing he was flawed helped me to forgive my own unsatisfactory behavior. It relieves me to think he was a not a “god” but an ordinary human being like me who shared the same struggles in sobriety with character defects as I such as, temptation, fear, desire, and jealousy. If Bill stayed sober knowing he was deficient in character then so can I one day at a time.

Anonymous
RE: re-depression

Thanks for this discription of our co-founder. I
believe it to be accurate, although that belief was a
long time coming for me. Bill W. was relieved from
that obsession and compulsion by a spiritual awakening.
He finally found a way (method, technique, gadget)
to pass that solution to other suffering alcoholics.
What worked with others, was simply talking about his
own experience with an attitude of humility and weakness.
Initially Bill's attempts to help others was what Bill
called spectacularly unsuccessful. For six months Bill
used what I call the "How it Works" approach. That
approach did not work, and is not working for us today.
Bill was very much just another man, certainly not
a saint. (we are not saints). But he was determined that
a workable solution to alcoholism would not be lost.
Bill left everything we need to know to keep this solution
alive. Although my generation has pushed the solution
aside, it is still written in our simple history. Bill
left it for us, despite his own imperfections. In a nutshell
it can still be found in the IDEA left to us by Bill
and Dr Silkworth. Many thanks for the message. ANONYMOUS

clu1992
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Joined: 2012-05-30
re

Please post were u found the story of bill w screaming for booze

Anonymous
Re-please post were u found the story of Bill

I suggest doing some homework. There is a thing called the Internet.
Many of Bills low lights are common knowledge at this juncture in AA's history but, his high lights gave us AA and me a way out into a new life.

recovery2day
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Joined: 2013-01-06
Surviving AA - Food For Thought

Sometimes I get the odd call, or someone will share about how they have had enough of AA (often after many years sobriety) and my response is normally to share my experience and not resort to a quick dismissive remark about them being sick, quite often they are well and on the receiving end of a 'sick' meeting. I remember my sponsor saying that AA was not a fellowship of the well but there were well people in AA. When you live in a major metropolis, such as London, whilst there is no shortage of meetings (hundreds per week) and members, you are going to find the a range of sobriety and a few ( I stress a few) meetings which test your tolerance. Often the traditions have been forgotten at such meetings. A few examples, a speaker meeting where the chair shared about their OCD and all shared back about Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (the cause of their alcoholism) maybe I should have said something but walked away justifying to myself it wasn't my home home group. There are those who think they are experts in medicine and try and advise others on health and medication (dangerous and arrogant). At a speaker meeting this week, the speaker shared how he did not suffer from fears , had no resentments and talked at the group, turned out he had been drinking the day before and the group secretary picked him at the last minute not knowing this (the speaker needed help as a suffering alcoholic not an opportunity to take the chair at the meeting).

So AA is just like real life there are going a be few disappointments and answer for me is not to walk away but to share with another long term member for their take on the meeting as it could be just me being over sensitive or expecting every meeting to be as I would like it to be.

The answer is to keep coming back and mention the Traditions when it helps. Also for me to watch out for the old perfectionism streak as in my 30 years plus continuous sobriety I would guess I have been to about 5000 meetings of which I would say about less than 50 have been wacky, this means 99% have been good, sober, and left me walking away feeling good about life and recovery. Sadly some will see a 'bad' meeting as a reason not to return and no longer see the need to pass on the gift they have been given. So part of my recovery today is accepting that sobriety is sometimes surviving AA as well , focusing on the good and seeing the value of the Traditions more and more.

rootman01
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Joined: 2011-11-04
Surviving AA-Food for Thought

From what I have been told from “old Timers” such as your –self, with 30 years Plus sobriety, I live In the part of the USA where AA traditions are adhered to at meetings, meaning; members don’t go off on tangents about medical issues associated with alcoholism such as, OCD or bipolar, or how when they drank they did drugs and other things and talk about them instead of Alcohol. Because If they do they are reminded that they are in an AA meeting.

With that said, this part of the country also realizes that (or the people that have been through a detox), you are DULE- Diagnosed, 80% of Alcoholics also suffer from mental Illness, so it wouldn’t be uncommon for you to hear that in any AA meeting, just not as a main topic and any group conesus can stop the sharing of such a topic. The confusing thing to me is, someone 30years PLUS sober, should know this or should at least have the serenity to let it go.

Anonymous
Wake-Up Call-Stagnant in AA

I remember my early AA day’s hearing a lot of God talk. It didn’t offend me because I believed in God. I grew up in the church and was not threatened by prayer or miracles. I often looked down upon atheists and agnostics and considered them troublemakers. They were saying things about AA I didn’t want to hear. AA at the time to me was a simple program of god, steps and miracles. Why don’t they go somewhere else? When I started to recover and my brain cleared up I was in a more generous position to listen. They were not troublemakers at all but, brothers and sisters with legitimate concerns about the fellowship. These members actually loved the fellowship more than I! In social groups, sometimes it’s the edge people or minorities who hold the rope that can free the majority from the dogmatic quicksand it is sinking in and point it to a higher place. One day, I was listening to this atheist elder in our group share. He was more passionate about recovery and AA than I was because I think he had to fight for everything. He had a stronger grasp on spirituality and a better sense of the world. The truth hurt. It was a wake-up call. In my AA comforts, I actually was not growing at all. I realized I was hiding behind the language of recovery but not living it. I could razzle-dazzle people into thinking I knew it all but, I really didn’t. I studied the big book and steps and was miserable and here was a man that didn’t do any of that and was peaceful and friendly. I’m certainly not going to become an atheist of agnostic anytime soon, but I’ve learned to keep an open mind like the sign above our door. I’ve learned not to judge other members and treat everyone in the rooms with dignity and respect. Most importantly, I can’t have a “leave well-enough alone recovery.” I must continue to change as I march forward towards the grave.

Anonymous
My First Meeting

The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. Sounds easy enough…right? After walking through a cloud of cigarette smoke, I walked into a room and saw what appeared to be an assortment of nuts and empty seats. Then the meeting started. Some guy mumbled a bunch of rules that took forever. People were disinterested. It was a colossal bore. Then a person was instructed to start a discussion topic. He talked about God. The man seemed angry. He went on and on threatening new people like me to find God, work the steps or die. Then a person started talking about depression and the leader stopped her saying this is about alcoholism only. She got up and left. The next man called on paraphrased pages from a book as a few people nodded their heads. During the meeting, a young woman with the tightest outfit got up several times as many males gazes descended on her delightfully. And what these people all have in common is they are all talking in some weird coded language dipped in religious ideas. Then I thought, “I don’t belong here because I’m not a religious person” After the meeting a stranger walked up to me, “Hi I’m Dave, welcome, if you need anything let me know” This kindness disarmed me and I thought, “I’m not religious but, he seemed okay.” Then other aliens spoke. “Forget the god crap for now; just don’t pick up the first drink for one day. Can you do that at least?” “I lied, cheated and stole from the ones that loved me the most” “I wrecked my car in a blackout” “Once I picked up the first drink, I was off to the races” “I couldn’t even hold a wrench, my hands would shake so much.” “Woke up in jail with dried blood on my face” “She left me” “I forgot my kids at the mall” I remember identifying completely and it was comforting hearing laughter and meaningful conversation through it all. And that’s how it all started. My first impression of the actual meeting was not the greatest but afterwards the real human connection was pure gold.
Just Another Drunk

Anonymous
Just Another Drunk

You are one of the very few who stick around for the
real message. Most get up and leave, maybe not physically,
but mentally they are saying "let me out of here".
The way the A.A. message is most effectively
carried is by sharing our own experiences, not by a lot
of redundant reading and chanting. We fail hundreds of
thousands of suffering alcoholics every year by the
very things that you mentioned. Keep them in mind and
when the opportunity presents itself, voice your
concerns to the group. Alcoholics are dying while
we read, chant and pray. ANONYMOUS

Anonymous
excuses

Last year I tried AA but then quickly found excuses to stay away. And I drank. Now I want to go back...need to go back...but feel ashamed and fearful I will fall back on my "excuses".

Anonymous
Excuses!!! Please come back to AA for your own sake.

If you need AA it is there for you. You have a powerful experience that some other Alcoholic will listen to and identify with.

We all drank ourselves into AA membership!

Anonymous
Join the croud

Almost no one gets the "Introductory Offer". Thousands before you and likely millions after you will try AA, drink, try AA.
I hope you come to my meeting. I need you as much as you need us. Good luck.

Anonymous
excuses

as a drunk who needed 19 start overs to finally get it i totally understand. no one will look down on u when u walk back in. be honest and let your higher power take over. it does work but only if u work it.

julie b

Anonymous
Excuses

Well, you made it here once. There's nothing stopping you from coming back. I came in the first time in '76 because i beat up the woman I was seeing at the time. Don't remember. Went to AA and didn't think it was for me. Stayed sober for 2 years and then caught up for lost time. This time I was jailed for a hit & run, leaving the scene, impaired. I get it now 27 years later. Its a disease. You can do it. We need you. We need each other in this program. Hope this helps. Good luck.

Anonymous
RE: excuses

Any alcoholic ought to be allowed to enter our A.A.
rooms without embarrassment, or shame. That is why we
deleted the sentence in our format asking if anyone
is just coming back. We ask if anyone is new who would
like to introduce themselves. We do not give out "coins",
and no one is made a spectacle.
Use every ounce of courage and return to A.A. We need
you just as much as you need us. ANONYMOUS

Anonymous
It seems you have a simple

It seems you have a simple decision to make... Do you want to continue living the misery your currently living or are you willing to change everything? I have the power to change if you just embrace it. Dont continue to hold yourself back...let yourself free to exprience a new way of life. Yes at first its hard...but just dont give up on yourself...and keep tryin

Anonymous
Power to change?

"I have the power to change if you just embrace it."
You must be God.
Why do we tell newcomers, and everyone else coming to
our rooms that they have to change everything? If an
alcoholic wants to get sober the only thing they must
do is to stop drinking. Other things will change as time
passes. New friends, new sober habits.
It may sound cute to say "the only thing you have to
change is "everything" and it usually brings a laugh.
Staying away from alcohol is all we ought to be encourging
any alcoholic, especially newcomers, to do. Manny Q.

Anonymous
No need to fear

Thank you for posting. It's only in our minds that we think people judge us harshly for relapsing. If someone in the meeting is truly living on a spiritual basis he/she will be more than happy to see you after a relapse. The best statistic in AA is that 100% of people who work the steps on a daily basis stay sober. That has been the case for me, I will pick up my 5 year chip on 3/1/12. Our disease wants us alone and it is so harmful, we are told in the AA big book to fearless and thorough from the very start. I still am a nervous person but I go to meetings anwyay and challenge myself to share even when I am scared. These past 5 years have been the best years of my life. Good luck and hope you find a sponsor! Its free!

AD010416
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Joined: 2012-01-18
Excuses vs Reasons

Untreated alcoholics can always find excuses to leave AA. When I was new I heard, I'm not like you because:
I never got a DUI.
I'm not divorced.
I still have a job.
I haven't been to jail.
I never wrecked my car.
Then some smart alec said, "Yet!" and shot down all the excuses.
So we come up with new ones:
I don't like to hold hands.
I don't want to believe in God.
I don't like to hear "How It Works."
I don't like the chanting.
I don't like the praying.
I don't like the focus on faults.
Not enough people hug me and shake my hand when I grace a meeting with my presence.
So groups appoint an official hugger and vote to stop holding hands, chanting, reading anything and praying, and the meetings focus on "How my day went today."
I guess the next excuse will be, There used to be something called Alcoholics Anonymous, it folded because everyone was too busy finding fault they lost sight of recovery.

Anonymous
RE: Excuses vs Reasons

Alcoholics, back in their caves, will be saying "what
a great thing A.A. could have been".
The Washingtonion Movement, very much like A.A. existed
for about ten years. One claim was 500,000 members before
it vanished.
Alcoholics Anonymous was effective for about four times
that, about 40 years. And we have about four times that
number of members.
A.A. today is like an eight cylinder engine running on
two cylinders. A.A. is barely alive, and could remain on life support for several more decades.
Reversing the blunders we have made in the past three
decades will be like turning back the tide. The greatest
obstacle is convincing today's membership that the tide
needs to be turned.
Evidence of our failure is our negative growth rate
over the past two decades. We have fewer members than
in 1992. The sad part is that we have a solution that
rarely fails. We have pushed that solution aside and
have substituted a TWELVE STEP PROGRAM which rarely works.
Our negative growth rate shows that the treatment
offered in today's A.A. is no more effective than no
treatment at all.
If A.A. folds it will be because of not correcting
the faults that we have found. ANONYMOUS

Anonymous
Jim S. Folded

When I came into the doors of Alcoholics Anonymous
I had never gotten a DUI. I had never been divorced, and
I had the best job of my life. I had been involved in
two fender-benders but had never been in jail, except
to visit my father.
There were no smart alecs that I remember. The meetings
were reverent. You would have called us a Glum Lot. We were
serious. We sat quietly and just listened as each person
shared, no response, crosstalk, or chanting.
Would you be willing to delete the hand holding if
it were keeping even one alcoholic away? Or would you
insist that "They are just not ready? How many members
would we push away if we had never started holding
hands in the "Ring around the Rosy" circle?
Would you be willing to stop all chanting if it
makes us look like a cult? Would you be willing to
stop praying at the meetings, and pray in church or
elsewhere on your own time?
Would you be willing to demand that your groups
stop reading "How It Works", or at least offer the
suggestion that it be deleted. This reading to all
and sundry makes us appear to be a religion.
Would you be willing to sacrifice all these things
which you may enjoy, if it will keep A.A. from folding?
Suffering Alcoholics are still approaching us by the
hundreds of thousands every year, searching for help.
They are desperate. Their families and friends are
desperate. They deserve to be treated with the same
method, technique, solution which Bill W. used when he
first approached Dr. Bob. Humility, not spiritual pride
is what worked then and will still work today. Bill
describes that meeting on Page 70 in AACA.
Tradition 12 is about humility, self sacrifice. We
need to return to the practice of humility, instead
of just preaching it. I beg of you to lose what I sense
as hostility and join the minority of us who are concerned
about the future of A.A. Future generations are going to
need it. We share many of the same concerns. That is
certainly good place to start. ANONYMOUS

Anonymous
AA is AA

Lets get out of the what if business and keep it simple if u have decided u want what we have and is willing to go to any length to get it then u are ready to take certain steps.We lay the program of recovery at the newcombers feet its up to them whether they want it or not.

Sanders W.

charboymark
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Joined: 2012-11-01
Meetings

I agree with Jim on the issue of hand holding and stuff but I also like the meetings that do hold hands and read. If you want to start a meeting where there is no hand holding and reading and keep it simple and free of religious over tones then by all means start a new meeting. If it takes hold and flourishes that is all for the better. No two meetings will be the same.
If you read the big book the word God is used quite frequently and in the chapter to the agnostic a fairly condescending attitude is used towards describing a person who does not believe in a God which I chose to call a hire power. But be that as it may I took to AA for the very reason of spirituality for that was what I was most deficient in.
We need new and different meetings to cover the the gamut of differing peoples and cultures. We are not all white men who only believe in a Christian God although it does appear that way sometimes.
Be at peace and God Bless
Mark

Anonymous
I attend a meeting where the

I attend a meeting where the Lords Prayer is not said, only the serenity prayer is said at the end of the meeting. How it works isn't read either. At first I thought this meeting was strange because every meeting I had been to at that point did all of those things. I was not aware that originally these readings and chants were not part of a meeting.

Anonymous
A Meeting Where:

In the decade of the 1970's, every meeting I attended
closed with the Lords Prayer. I attended about 5 meetings
a week. Bill W. wrote a letter to his friend "Russ",
explaining why the use of the Lords Prayer is acceptable.
It depends on the make-up of the group. The fully
informed group conscience makes the decision about how
to close the meeting. The letter is easy to find:
Search: Alcoholics Anonymous Bill Wilson Dear Russ
Letter. I recently read it and find it very
informative. Perhaps someone with computer skills
could find it and post it here.
The reading of How It Works and the chanting
started in my locale around 1980. We had always
sat quietly and just listened. Meetings were
reverent. I still remember the first time someone
sitting behind me at a meeting said "Hi Joe", when
I stated "My name is Joe, and I am an alcoholic."
At first I was startled and then annoyed when I
realized that he was going to "greet" every member
as they shared. In a very short time this became
a group chant. I believe it to be a cult ritual.
This was never meant to be a greeting or salutation.
It is part of steps one and five.
Thanks for the posting. ANONYMOUS

jkasten
Offline
Joined: 2011-05-22
A Letter From Bill Wilson A

A Letter From Bill Wilson
A Letter From Bill Wilson About The Use Of The Lord’s Prayer At A.A. Meetings

April 14, 1959

Dear Russ,

Am right sorry for my delay in answering. Lois and I were a long time out of the country and this was

followed by an attack of the marathon type of flu that has been around here in New York. We are

okay now, however, but I did want to explain my delay.

Now about the business of adding the Lord’s Prayer to each A.A. meeting.

This practice probably came from the Oxford Groups who were influential in the early days of AA.

You have probably noted in AA. Comes of Age what the connection of these people in AA really

was. I think saying the Lord’s Prayer was a custom of theirs following the close of each meeting.

Therefore it quite easily got shifted into a general custom among us.

Of course there will always be those who seem to be offended by the introduction of any prayer

whatever into an ordinary AA gathering. Also, it is sometimes complained that the Lord’s Prayer is a

Christian document. Nevertheless this Prayer is of such widespread use and recognition that the

arguments of its Christian origin seems to be a little farfetched. It is also true that most AAs believe

in some kind of God and that communication and strength is obtainable through His grace. Since this

is the general consensus it seems only right that at least the Serenity Prayer and the Lord’s Prayer be

used in connection with our meetings. It does not seem necessary to defer to the feelings of our

agnostic and atheist newcomers to the extent of completely hiding our light under a bushel.

However, around here, the leader of the meeting usually asks those to join him in the Lord’s Prayer

who feel that they would care to do so. The worst that happens to the objectors is that they have to

listen to it. This is doubtless a salutary exercise in tolerance at their stage of progress.

So that’s the sum of the Lord’s Prayer business as I recall it. Your letter made me wonder in just what

connection you raise the question.

Meanwhile, please know just how much Lois and I treasure the friendship of you both. May

Providence let our paths presently cross one of these days.

Devotedly yours,

Bill Wilson

WGW/ni Mr. Russ

From the AA Archives in New York

Share this:

AD010416
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Joined: 2012-01-18
Re: A Meeting Where

"The reading of How It Works and the chanting
started in my locale around 1980."
"It is part of steps one and five."
??? Steps one and five?
Different localities, different customs. During 1971, '72 and '73 I attended meetings in five states and three foreign countries. Nearly all began with a reading from Chapter Five, some also read a portion of Chapter Three. In most the members present "greeted" the person sharing.
I have been to meetings where the speaker opens his/her lead with a prayer of his/her choice.
Some localities still stress the importance of the Four Absolutes.
I have been to meetings where the only ones allowed to share were members of that particular group, who also, by coincidence, all had the same sponsor.
I have been to meetings conducted in languages other than English.
We can always find something wrong with a meeting if we want to find something wrong.
"Resentment is the number one offender."

clu1992
Offline
Joined: 2012-05-30
RE HIW

I belive it was Morty who moved to california and started an AA group in 1940 or so that insisted on the reading of "How it Works" to start the meetings there. It's in AA Comes of Age. Reading those pages from the big book has been around almost as long as the big book itself. Yes even during the booming times of early AA.

Corey

Anonymous
Mort HIW

Corey, Take a closer look at this reading in AACA. It says that Mort insisted on a reading from Chapter Five at the
meetings. He was the boss. He paid the rent. I doubt that
the first two and a half pages were read over and over.
Remember the preamble had not yet been written.
A reading from chapter five was probably used to open
the meeting. This eventually evolved into reading of the
HIW reading at today's meeting.
Why do you think that Bill W. waited until chapter
Five to write How It Works? Bill wrote that it
worried him to death, where to position HIW. Why did he not
write HIW in chapter one?
Today I believe that Bill placed How It Works in
chapter five for an exact timed effect. It never was
meant to be read from the podium to all and sundry.
In my opinion, it is a horrible mistake. ANONYMOUS

Anonymous
ADO10416

Jim S,
If a speaker at an A.A. meeting opened his/her talk with a prayer,
I believe I would get up and leave. We are not a prayer
group. Pray on your own time, not at an A.A. meeting.
I would hardly call it a resentment, just a serious
objection.
When I state "My name is Joe and I am an alcoholic"
is that not an admission that I am an alcoholic, part
of step one?
Admitting that to the group is part of step five.
Something is wrong when our groups do not grow.
We are responsible to make needed corrections. Of
course we have to first investigate. ANONYMOUS

AD010416
Offline
Joined: 2012-01-18
Get up and leave.

"If a speaker at an A.A. meeting opened his/her talk with a prayer,I believe I would get up and leave. We are not a prayer group."
Obviously you've never been to meetings in Eastern Ohio, and Western Pennsylvania.
"I would hardly call it a resentment, just a serious
objection."
A better word might be obsession.
I cut myself off from religion at the age of eighteen and haven't gone back. While drinking I tolerated numerous arrests for public drunkenness, sessions in front of commanding officers being thrown out of places and all the other things that happen to drunks. these were just part of the price I was willing to pay for the right to drink. Desperation got me to AA and allowed me to tolerate prayer, hand holding, chanting and sitting on a hard steel chair for long periods as part of the price I have to pay for recovery. It was suggested to me from the beginning that I focus on what I could gain from a meeting rather than try to see how many tings I could find to dislike about it.
"When I state "My name is Joe and I am an alcoholic"
is that not an admission that I am an alcoholic, part
of step one?"
See page 30 in the Big Book: We learned we had to fully concede TO OUR INNERMOST SELVES THAT WE WERE ALCOHOLICS. THIS IS THE FIRST STEP IN RECOVERY."
Anyone can admit to anything in front of a crowd. That doesn't mean they believe it themselves. at nearly any of our local open meetings there will be someone(with an attendance sheet) who will admit to being an alcoholic.
"Admitting that to the group is part of step five."
The Oxford Group held public confession, admitting one's 'sins' to the entire group.
Step Five in the AA program has us admitting only to God, ourselves, and ANOTHER (just one) human being.

Anonymous
Is believing in God and prayer necessary for recovery?

Well, it wasn't for me. I respect the more religious members but, I found it not necessary to have a belief in God to stay sober. Luckily, I lived in an area where there were members staying sober without god or prayer. These AA approved groups saved my life. What would of happened to me if I lived in an area where God was forced on me? I would probably be dead.
These loving AA'ers were the happiest people I had every met in my life. I wanted what they had..or didn't have. I was told AA was not a religous program although there are religious members as there are non-believers in AA. I learned that alcoholism is not a moral disease but a brain disorder/disease. My sins did not make me a drunk. The important thing for me was to go through withdrawal and let the mind settle down without alcohol and to be careful not to switch addictions. Losing my license for a year was a good thing because I had to ride my bike or walk everywhere. This kept me physically healthy and it helped manage my early recovery crazy thinking brain.

Anonymous
RE:Is believing in God and prayer necessary for recovery?

Even the devil belives in God -Whats the real issue for going against the sole purpose of the Big BooK?

Anonymous
Thank you for posting.

Thank you for your post. I'm trying to start an agnostic / atheist meeting in my area and I'm finding it difficult to find literature or guidance for this. Have any ideas?

Anonymous
Agnostics in AA

If you live in NYC this is a list of AA approved meetings.
http://agnosticaanyc.org/
If you live in the Bible belt, well good luck.
If you are an atheist and agnostic like I am, than you will have to grow a thick skin. I was 15 years sober when I moved from an open-mined, all-inclusive area to a downright religious AA area. I kept a low profile and hid my atheism. Because I was not authentic, a part of me started to die and I became depressed. One day a stranger appeared and rocked our men’s group. He was an atheist in AA sober 49 years and never said one pray. I remember a foolish younger member challenging him, "There are no atheists in foxholes" He laughed out loud and replied, "Look, I was in plenty of foxholes in WW11 and never said one prayer!" He was in town for a week and we spent plenty of time together. He returned to the Bronx and I never saw him again. He was a true guru for lack of a better word. The wisdom he shared has kept me sober another 15 years and yesterday I celebrated 30. Of course, my Christian AA friends will tell me god sent him to me. Living in the Bible belt you will experience hostility, rage and hatred, which may come in a silent form by being ignored. It’s challenging for newcomers because we go to AA for support but, in some areas you will only get support if you believe in god. Just to let you know, if you stick around you will find another non-believer. There are more agnostics in these areas then one would think. As I experienced, pretending to be something one is not is not healthy recovery. Hang in there, don’t pick up the first drink and you can take a stand against the fanatics by staying sober quietly one day at a time.

clu1992
Offline
Joined: 2012-05-30
re thank yo for posting

I would like to suggest to you the pamphlet the AA group. www.aa.org/pdf/products/p-16_theaagroup.pdf You will find most of what you need within that pamphlet. After your group establishes itself, regiser with GSO and they will send you a binder of material free of charge with all the information and requirements to be an AA group.

If you are an agnostic or atheist, I would also suggest study and use of the book Alcoholics Anonymous. Chapter 4 "We Agnostics" was written for us to use. Chapter 4 is only 14 pages. The guidlines for step 2 are found entirely in chapter 4.

I wish all the best to you and your efforts with your AA group.

Corey

Anonymous
And if you remain agnostic or atheist...

Feel free to chuckle at Chapter 4 and carry on in your recovery.

Some people say that the only thing they need to know is that there is a God and they aren't it. I just say that I don't believe in God, so I obviously don't think I'm it!

Anonymous
agonostic?atheist

I have a lot of ideas. Start your meeting if you must. That
may be an acceptable temporary solution. You may not find
any A.A. literature designed for that particular type of
A.A. meeting. Would it really be an A.A. meeting if those
who believe in God are excluded?
I see two tradition violations already: Tradition one, separating believers from non-believers. and the only
requirement tradition. It would imply that a member must
be an agnostic or atheist to attend the meeting.
I believe that the fellowship of Alcoholics Anonymous
was designed to accept any alcoholic who wants to get
well. What if a suffering alcoholic attends your
meeting at random? That person could be a believer
of God, or could have my personal belief in Christ.
He/She might find your non-beliefs unacceptable. It seems
that would be prejudice in reverse.
That is my main concern. How is the alcoholic new
comer going to respond to the message found at the
meeting.
Alcoholics Anonymous was never meant to be a
religion. Of course it has become one, a strange new
type of religion. Any alcoholic approaching A.A.
ought to be allowed absolutely to keep her/his belief
in the God of their own understanding. They can develop
that understanding, or improve on it. Or they have
complete freedom to ignore the God concept totally.
A.A. does not demand that an alcoholic believe anything,
or pay anything. The Big Book and the twelve steps were based of course on religion. The early members used what
was available. But the few agnostic/atheist members
fought to make the steps suggestive. And Bill wrote
that the Big Book was meant to be suggestive only.
To suggest something is just to mention or instill an
idea for that person's consideration, without any coercion.
Whether that idea is rejected or ignored, is not none
of our business.
I suppose that Hank and Jimmy could have just left
the group and started their own A.A. but they stayed
and fought to make our fellowship all inclusive. It
was not easy. Bill wrote that those "discussions" went
on day and night, but those men left us a fellowship
(not Fellowship) which is all inclusive.
So start your own meeting (as if you need my blessing)
LOL. But continue with our other meetings and make every
effort to return A.A. to a fellowship. Remove the 24hr.
book from the meetings. Stop reading How It Works aloud
at meetings. They are just too religious. Be prepared
for some resistance (again LOL). Bill often mentioned
the value of the minority opinion.
I suppose that everyone but me knows that LOL is
laugh Out Loud. Group Of Drunks be with you. ANONYMOUS

Anonymous
re-atheist -agnostic

You mentioned, "Would it really be an A.A. meeting if those
who believe in God are excluded?" To answer this let me say I think your assuming agnostics and atheists groups are excluding people. This is not correct thinking. All Agnostic and Atheistics AA approved groups welcome believers and non-believers.
In our group occasionally a more religious AA speaker will share their experience strength and hope. If the word "God" or "Jesus" comes up we don't extend the cane and pull them off the stage. Our format is simply not God laden. Our group closes with, "Live and Let Live" We provide all AA approved literature and books at a table. Our purpose is to provide a safe place for the newcomer and to inform them sobriety can be attained by anyone with the help of the A.A. fellowship and principles, without relying on a Higher Power.

clu1992
Offline
Joined: 2012-05-30
re is believing......

From the book “Alcoholics Anonymous” page 34 reads, “For those who are unable to drink moderately the question is how to stop altogether. We are assuming of course, that the reader desires to stop. Whether such a person can quit upon a nonspiritual basis depends upon the extent to which he has already lost the power to choose whether he will drink or not”. From my personal experience and those I have witnessed over the years this is true. High bottom or potential alcoholics seem to be able to stop or moderate. The low bottom alcoholics, like myself, have lost the power to choose whether they will drink or not. I got sober through identification with alcoholics. I stay sober by growing spiritually through working AA’s 12 steps as outlined in the book “Alcoholics Anonymous”. We should take notice that we only mention spiritual not religion or church. Also notice God as I understand Him is in italics in step 3 and 11. I think italics suggest it’s important! In AA it truly is God as you understand him, not how everyone else does!
On page 44 it says, “If, when you honestly want to, you find you cannot quit entirely, or if when drinking you have little control over the amount you take, you are probably alcoholic. If that be the case, you MAY be suffering from an illness which only a spiritual experience will conquer”. It goes on to say something like half of us thought we were atheist or agnostic. For me the MAY part of the paragraph is the key word. We can only decide for ourselves by trial and error. Is what I’m doing working or not?
I found I couldn’t leave alcohol alone for any period of time (mental obsession) and once I started to drink I couldn’t stop (physical allergy). I tried going to meetings and not drinking using a nonspiritual basis. I could make it 6 days up to 9 months. Alcohol beat me into a position where I was willing to try the spiritual basis. I think that's practicing the 12 steps of AA.
This has been my experience, how about you?
Good luck and God bless you!
Corey

Anonymous
believing...

You stated, "My question is this, if we are not carrying the message of AA as outlined in the basic text of AA, who’s message are we carrying?" Well, I should think we are carrying our own experience, strength and hope, which is wisdom acquired by staying sober one day at a time and living life on life’s terms out in the real world and not by hiding out in AA rooms memorizing and quoting pages of the Big Book, judging others and acting holier than thou. Knowledge and wisdom are two different things. There’s been a fundamentalist style of AA fueled by arrogance and self-righteousness creeping into many rooms over the years trying to cleanse AA of the infidels. Bill W. was afraid of this happening and was totally against it. This “Holy-man of the Hill” recovery attitude is not healthy for AA. It makes us look like a bunch of hoity-toity, highfalutin, pompous recovery snobs. I’ve learned to mind my own business in AA. I couldn’t care less how another AA brother or sister gets sober. To me, in a way, we are a family and love and tolerance is our code. Why do certain members insist they are better than others or have a need to defend a recovery path which is optional? It’s ironic the top five members of our group are all agnostics and atheists. (39, 32, 28, 25 and 21) I’ve learned so much from them. They opened my closed eyes to understand what recovery is all about. I try and embrace all members in my group with equality. Whether they believe or not believe in a higher power. Whether they read this or not, whether they sit in the back or in the front. Whenever I’m pointing my finger at someone there are three fingers pointing back at me. My sponsor used to say, “When you walk on water let me know my great pigeon”

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