Burning Desire to Share

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Anonymous
better to give then take

It's all about finding a balance for me. When I was drinking everything got out of balance. I became like a black hole, take, take, take not even love could escape. Now with the program of AA I'm learning to give. To get that balance of give and take that healthy happy people have. Now I'm like a Sun shining out my loving light. It's so much better to give the take.

Anonymous
the wheels in my head are

the wheels in my head are spinnin so fast today Im waiting for smoke to start comein out of my ears. I am fresh back in the rooms for a little over a week now. I have no idea what to do with these overwhelming feelings that are being thrown at me on what seems to be a minute to minute basis. feeling very lonely, irritable, and definitely discontent.But I have a willingness to stick this out for the eventual outcome. how do I ease this mental suffering in the meantime until the obsession is removed?

Anonymous
the wheels in my head are

Hi - I've been sober for 36 years, and it does get better, but never perfect. Whenever my wheels start spinning again I've stopped doing what I know I should be doing, (plus that little extra to grow on). Please remember that this is a one-day-at-a-time program, and that's the only way it works. Do what you know you need to do, do it for yourself, and do it right here, right now, today. And then start all over again tomorrow. Do that for a week and I guarantee you will notice a difference.

Anonymous
the wheels in my head

Do you have a sponsor or even one person at the meeting with whom you can talk? It seems like you need a listening ear. Don't keep things in your head. Talk to your Higher Power. I wish you peace.

Anonymous
Re: Spinning wheels

Sounds like the Committee-is screaming for a drink. What I did (and still do) is to make my commitment to not picking up that 1st drink a live-or-die affair, go to every meeting I can and keep my ears and ears attentive for a power greater than myself in everything I experience. I stayed busy doing productive things, even if it was just working out, taking a walk, something to occupy my mind. The activity didn't have to be frenetic, just something that would engage my attention. Reading AA literature, talking on the phone to an AA friend, a little service doesn't hurt, the more peaceful, the better. That part of me that screams and yammers away at me is just fearful and trying to make sense of the abuse I put it through. Time does heal it. Stay busy in the meantime with your recovery (seek your HP first...) and the answer will follow.

Anonymous
reply the wheels in my head etc.

when i first came into the rooms i was full of negative thinking and had feelings of low self-esteem remorse doubt and the like. basically this is why i drank. i wanted to feel good. if i was to stop drinking i had to learn how to deal with these emotions. at first i took the slogans as many as i thought applied to me at that time, let go and let god, one day at a time, easy does it, etc. my best thinking brought me here and i learned to listen to learn and learn to listen and i heard how others dealt with their thinking and their solutions and i tried them see if they will work for me . i had to learn how to share my feelings, anger, sadness, despair, hopelessness, whatever was the emotion of the day and share it at a meeting or with a sponsor or an aa friend and listen to what they said. most of the time they said not to be hard on myself, to put down the bat and pick up a feather to stick with the winners, the one's that seem like they are working the program and not talking the program. i learned to sit still for a minute meditate let go of everything to my higher power. i started to learn tolove myself the way i was and be my own best friend. star

lunchbunch
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Joined: 2013-01-08
Wheels

Early sobriety can be a complicated mess involving emotions, chemical changes,life changes, consequences, wreckage. The standard message of go to meetings, get and use a sponsor, read the book, work the steps, pray, be of service might be enough for now.

I eventually had to deal with the new reality of living in the world in a body without alcohol or other chemical relief.

I began to experience things that I didn't even have names for such as anxiety and depression. Being honest about these things with other recovering members helped me realize I was not alone and that there was a way out.

As my mind and body cleared up, I became more sensitive to things. I learned that there were consequences to diet, coffee intake, tobacco use, physical activity, lifestyle and such. Certain substances or activities could impact me in a positive or negative way. I had always been an athlete and found that physical activity took the edge off my anxiety and depression.

I began riding a bike to meetings and became known as "Bicycle Bill". I enjoyed the peace and serenity I felt pedalling to and from meetings.(eventually became bike racer and race promoter) I gave up the roller coaster ride of chewing tobacco and learned how much coffee and sugar I could handle. I discovered the things in life that lifted my spirits and gravitated towards those things (especially AA) and away from the things that took me down.

This is part of the joy and journey of sobriety. It is a journey towards freedom and serenity and away from restlessness, irritability and discontent.

061700
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Joined: 2013-05-23
the wheels in my head

I can sure relate to the wheels in the head thing. I had to follow the suggestions that were given at my first meeting. Get a BB, a sponsor, then follow his suggestions. It really does work, but it took a few days to stop the wheels from spinning.
Keep coming back to the meetings and listen for the similarities from others in the rooms.

Anonymous
Our devilish alcoholic personalities (book)

I just read this book and it more or less woke me up... Been sober for 21 months and the "I am sober balloon has basically crashed and burned". I am in a relationship (long story) but I find myself blaming this for all my negative feelings. After reading this book I am more aware of maybe I am using this is a good excuse to fall off the wagon. It worries me... I need to get back with the program and stop feeling sorry for myself. Honestly take some real time to thank God and do some honest praying daily. I could on and on but my sober life depends on me getting off my but and contributing to my own and AA's program. I do recommend this book.

Anonymous
devilish

Until we make some serious changes, most alcoholics don’t know the difference between a relationship and a hostage situation. The book Alcoholics Anonymous outlined the changes I needed to make. We celebrated our twelfth wedding anniversary with a cruise last year. I’m on such a winning streak I think I‘ll read it again.

Anonymous
Deep Sadness

I have only just joined AA. I woke up and realised that I have become my alcoholic mother who ruined my life. I have been drinking heavily to avoid the sadness I feel when I am sober. My partner wants nothing to do with me anymore because of the drinking and I finally see I have a problem. I have tried for the last 12 years to have a family and now think, maybe its gods way of making sure that another child doesn't have to bear what I did as a child. How can I stop drinking

Suzi1L
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Joined: 2013-12-17
I really don't think God

I really don't think God works that way. There are many reasons for infertility, and the problem could be yours, your partner's, or a combination.
The way to begin your journey in sobriety is simple:
1. Don't drink, even if your butt falls off.
2. Read the Big Book.
3. Go to as many meetings as you can, and stick with the folks who have long term sobriety.
4. Find someone who has what you want, and ask that person to sponsor you.
5. Let your sponsor help you with the steps.
Just keep coming back, and coming back, and coming back!

Anonymous
Relapsing???

I've been sober for 26 years. Two days before Christmas, I sought out one of my son's friends that I know smokes pot. He met me and I took 3 hits off a joint. It was an awful experience and I was back in AA the next day. I never thought it was going to be something that I would do moving forward. I should have seen it coming because I've missed alot of meetings over the past year because I'm attending Nursing school. Tomorrow's my 27th anniversary and I'm having a dilemma over what to do. I haven't told anyone yet and I'm not sure what to do. Pot was never my drug of choice, it was alcohol. I'm totally perplexed. Any advice??

tcdpenn2
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Joined: 2014-01-05
Relapsing???

When I relapsed I told friends in the program, and stood up in AA meetings to talk about it. It was *enormously* helpful to me (and others said it was helpful to them). I learned that I relapsed because I wasn't working on my AA program every day.

A sobriety date is just a day like any other 24 hours. We have only a "daily reprieve" in which to maintain our spiritual condition, and "rigorous honesty" is essential to that maintenance. (BB pp. 58, 85)

Anonymous
relapse

We got straight and sober about the same time. I haven’t used the equation program = meetings for a long time although I attend some meetings out of gratitude to carry the message. It’s “Practicing these principals” that keeps me where I need to be. Your concern for how you look instead of how you are is a loud tell. So is the premeditation and letting it fester for weeks until caught in the dilemma to get honest or get a medallion. The Big Book tells us that “our liquor was but a symptom”. It’s a safe bet you have others. You’re starting a new life as a nurse, why not start a new life? The tools are waiting for you.

Anonymous
grief

have been sober for 9 1/2 years. have been active in aa but when my husband became ill my meetings slowed down. my husband was diagnosed the 18 of april 2012 and passed away july 18 2012 of multiple myleoma and primary gallbladder cancer. i cared for him at home (i am a nurse). No one wants to talk about him anymore - it is like he has been erased from family conversations. friends are uncomfortable when i bring up his name. blah blah blah
guess my issue is spiritual. i see Gods love guidance and direction in my life only in retrospect. i cannot seem to pray - i feel empty. i have been going to 4-5 meetings a week - have a new sponsor (5 months) but i just feel i am faking the whole thing. i feel dead inside.
have not wanted to drink but i feel anger at strangers - have yelled at people in parking lots. this is not like me. i feel like a shell. know it is said God is always there when we seek him and that we are the ones that step away - but i just cant figure out how to regain my spiritual life. has anyone else experienced this.

P64A16
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Joined: 2014-01-26
Grief

I can relate to your story. My husband had a major stroke June 19, 2010 and passed away June 25, 2010. I was blessed to have a sponsor who had lost her husband quickly, however it had been about 9 years. One day I could not function and reached out for help through the hospice group which my husband had been under their care. They had just started a grief support group. The support group were 3 women and we had all lost our husbands within 6 weeks of each other. The other big key was action to take. When the pain was so great, the Chaplin had another assignment. Know 3 1/2 years later, I know God has been there each and every time I reached out for helped.

Anonymous
Grief

My son was murdered 15 years ago. I felt responsible for his death (I didn't protect him) and howled for a year solid. When that settled down I was extremely angry and prone to go off. I stopped attending meetings regularly for 7 years, but kept up the group sessions I had started with my health care provider. I had started my recovery with these folks and felt very safe and respected. I did not feel safe at AA because I might jump across the table at some idiot " just trying to help" with some inane advise. I was extremely angry ( did I already mention that?). My therapist that had helped me early on in sobriety saw us for a year, no charge, and helped my wife and I walk thru the grief. My wife couldn't stand some of the intense feelings and got trapped in depression. My son just fell asleep at the sessions and stopped going so he could medicate himself (he is now one of us). I worked as hard as I could. Still had the anger raging, still coming out, though it did calm down with time. After 7 years of banging away at it, I got back to the rooms. There I ran into a man who had been through and was going through much worse (bone cancer, sent home to die 4 times, had a relationship with his God) and he agreed to be my sponsor. Soon after that, I lost my job and had about a year to work the steps thoroughly with him. We talked a lot about God, why does He " let bad things happen to good people", et al. He taught me to really give my will and my life over to the care of God, as I understand Him. Surrender is the key for me; stop trying to figure out how to get even, feel the feelings and let 'me go ( resentments are to feel again life and keep them looping through) and get back in the service thing.
Even with all Hell breaking loose around me, I have slowed down. I have had to see that not only learning and practicing forgiveness to the murderer of my son was necessary, learning and practicing forgiveness of myself (acceptance) was absolutely vital. The why of it is not my business, it is above my pay grade. But as I have done my best to practice the principles in all my affairs, God has seen fit to illuminate those things He knows I need to know (a little glimpse through a glass darkly). Icing on the cake. And I am almost giddy these days, sometimes, because I have learned to love. My son has come along (5 years and counting), my wife came alive after the birth of our first grandchild (didn't see that one coming), all in all, not a bad gig, but there was a lot of darkness along the way. And who's to say something else won't happen? That is not my business. As I have heard before, sobriety is patient progress punctuated by heavy setbacks. I am just thankful that God kept me sober and I can share my experience, strength and hope with another.God built the strength in me, I just kept tugging at the oars.

Hatmama
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Joined: 2014-01-19
Grief

Yes, I have experienced much the same. It was more than 20 years ago, I was 7 years sober. My program friends were very helpful and supportive, but after a time they didn't understand that I was still vulnerable and sad. They wanted me to return to the person who did not cry, who could find her way across town without getting lost, and who was not still frequently a mess. Thankfully I found a grief recovery group which helped more than I could imagine. I began to be able to go to meetings without crying. Therapy and expressing my feelings in art and writing helped. Time helped. Staying sober and having sober friends helped most of all.

Anonymous
grief

I lost husband, mother and brother in just a couple years. I took care of all of them. There were times when I couldn't pray and times when I was dead inside. I really had to allow myself to go through the stages including anger at God, aging and disease, as well as family for leaving me.

An inventory of what ticks me off really does help. It means pulling out the stops and just being honest about how I hated this or that aspect of what they went through or what I went through.
It certainly wasn't in my plans to go through all that and have none of them left to hug me when it was over. I have learned that sometimes I am too restricted to let myself be as I am and to feel and think freely. Sometimes I numb out so I won't feel the waves of grieving but that just makes it worse when I do feel.
And it is scarey to be angry with God. But I found out that God allows and understands it.
I also found that making entries in a gratitude journal several times a day was helpful. I started with thanks for my sobriety and that I'm not hugging a toilet puking my guts out.
But the most important thing was finding the willingness to move forward and to allow other events and activities to be my focus. Finding a way to be of service and practicing gratitude while doing that service helped. Praying for others who are suffering helped too.

bradpearso
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Joined: 2014-01-17
Grief

I've heard it said many times in meetings, "Expectations are basically premeditated resentments." As I read your share, it seems that you've been EXPECTING friends and family to continue to talk about your beloved, late husband; and that you've also been EXPECTING to feel God's guidance and direction in your life the way you're used to feeling it, the latter in spite of your hurting heart. All I can say is that when my expectations have led to resentments, then feelings of emptiness and even anger are often the result. I love and appreciate YOU for your honesty and vulnerability, and thank you for helping keep ME sober today.

Suzi1L
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Joined: 2013-12-17
Grief

The spirituality will come back in time; don't try to force it. Be gentle with yourself and allow yourself to grieve. Stay close to AA. Whatever you do, don't drink.

Anonymous
grief

Yes, I've felt that way. I wasted years trying to make AA fix something that it doesn't fix. Print out what you posted here and take it to your doctor. As the son of a nurse and a friend of several others I know that nurses are good at sending people to the doctor but are the world's worse at going themselves. What do you have to lose except misery?

Anonymous
want to drink

day 3 of sobriety and I feel like drinking

tcdpenn2
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Joined: 2014-01-05
want to drink

When I want to drink I call someone from the program. So I suggest you go to a meeting a.s.a.p., tell people you feel like drinking, get some phone numbers, and use them when you want to drink.

Anonymous
postpone that drink!!

KEEP PUTTING THE DRINK OFF!! DON'T DRINK!! YOU WILL SEE, EVENTUALLY THIS TOO SHALL PASS, AND YOU'LL BE SO GLAD YOU DIDN'T ALLOW THE INSANITY THAT WE ALL KNOW SO WELL IT WILL BRING!! GOOD LUCK!!

Anonymous
postpone that drink!!

KEEP PUTTING THE DRINK OFF!! DON'T DRINK!! YOU WILL SEE, EVENTUALLY THIS TOO SHALL PASS, AND YOU'LL BE SO GLAD YOU DIDN'T ALLOW THE INSANITY THAT WE ALL KNOW SO WELL IT WILL BRING!! GOOD LUCK!!

Anonymous
wanting to drink

The first days were the hardest for me too. I used a drink for everything - to feel better, to feel worse, to not feel. It became so central to my daily life that when I stopped, I really didn't know what to do. The suggestion I had heard at the first meeting was the one I held on to - just don't drink and get to a meeting. I was also told that the urge to drink would diminish, and that if I did not drink my life would get better. That was the hope I needed. Hang in there.

Anonymous
having a urge to drink

trying to stay sober having a strong urge to drink.at the moment thiers some drinking going on at my home,day 3 of my sobriety

Anonymous
urge to drink - others around drinking

I had to avoid people who were drinking a lot early on -- and still do, for that matter. The temptation was just too great, as was the opportunity for me to rationalize that since "they can drink, so can I." Some of "those people" were themselves alcoholics who needed help like I did, the others were those strange folks that could drink one night, and then not drink for weeks at a time after that without even thinking about it. For me it was best to stay away or get away from situations in which folks were going to be drinking. Today I can handle it, though I prefer not to have to.

Anonymous
Others around drinking

I too had to let go of all my friends not easy but extremely helpful to not see others drink. Lately avoiding tv thus avoiding "alcoholic beverage" commercials instead been reading the big book, grapevine magazines and any book relating to AA experience, strength and hope including the bible! Best wishes to all and happy 24 hrs!!!

Anonymous
Others around drinking

I too had to let go of all my friends not easy but extremely helpful to not see others drink. Lately avoiding tv thus avoiding "alcoholic beverage" commercials instead been reading the big book, grapevine magazines and any book relating to AA experience, strength and hope including the bible! Best wishes to all and happy 24 hrs!!!

jodee
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Joined: 2012-01-26
Annonimity

I attended a meeting for an anniversary celebration. When the celebrant received their coin a camera was taken out and a picture snapped of this person receiving their coin. I do not believe this was right to do so as it broke several peoples anonymity. I don't believe anyone else noticed as I just happened to look that way as it happened. AA material on the walls so no mistaking where we were.I chose to just let go and let God handle it. This has troubled me quite a bit and with me still. I'm praying for God to take it completely and is the reason I choose to share it here. Seems to take some of the sting . I chose not to say anything, as in asking anyone if they noticed, not wanting to stir up controversy. Any suggestions as to how I should have handled this hot mess? differently?
Thank you all for listening....
Annonymus please

Anonymous
press, radio, film and internet

Our General Service Conference has extended AA’s recommendation on anonymity to include the internet.

Box 4-5-9 Summer 2013

bottom of page 3

Public Information—that the 63rd General Service
Conference affirm that the Internet, social media and all
forms of public communications are implicit in the last
phrase of the Short Form of Tradition Eleven, which
reads: “…at the level of press, radio and films”;

Dictionary
Implicit (adjective)
1.implied, rather than expressly stated: implicit agreement.
2. unquestioning or unreserved; absolute: implicit trust; implicit obedience; implicit confidence.

Some think in terms of anonymity protecting the individual so it is the individual's prerogative to break their own anonymity at whatever level they choose. Protecting the individual is part of it. The rest of it is protecting AA from ego trippers climbing on a pedestal and screaming "HEY LOOK AT ME, I'M IN AA" and being clueless, falling off.

Anonymous
Anonymity

That's an interesting topic in this age of social media. At a minimum it would seem one would need to get the permission of everyone in the pic.

Then, there is the question of how it will be used. If posted to any social media site, even an account restricted to AA friends, you can quickly lose control of how the pic is reused.

I participated on an AA panel that addressed social media and heard from a member whose pic was taken at the wedding of an AA friend. She was horrified when that pic was later posted to a social media site that referred to folks in the picture as AA friends. She had no intention of revealing herself at that level.She would have been fine with the pic if it had omitted any reference to AA.

The basis of the 11th tradition is that our relations with the general public should be characterized by personal anonymity in regards to our membership in AA.

It seems that the use of cameras at AA meetings & functions can open up all kinds of trouble.

Anonymous
RE: Anonymity

I do appreciate and treasure the photos of Bill and
Dr. Bob and the other dozen or more founders. Those
alcoholics and friends have earned a place in our
history. and it is nice to know what they looked like.
Recording devices whether cameras smart phones or tape
recorders have no place in the AA meeting or group function of today.
I was saddened to see photos of my area delegate attending
the General Service Conference. It reeks of big shot ism.
The Tradition ought to read "Humility, expressed by
anonymity is the spiritual foundation of all our traditions,
ever reminding us to place principles before personalities.
Humility is the spiritual foundation, not anonymity.
If we can develop an understanding of this principle,
maybe AA's effectiveness can be restored. ANONYMOUS

Anonymous
re anonymity

I'm glad that it troubles you, it should. Anonymous is half of our name. Those who don't understand that aren't likely apt to respond to subtleties. Our leadership structure does not designate any particular member an enforcer. Our traditions require each of us to be responsible for AA's well being.

If God comes in and deletes the memory from that camera, let us know. Otherwise I think He made it perfectly clear with that sting you feel that you are his designated agent.

Technically a person could say that the photos only provide a means for a break of anonymity at a public level. For me AA and it's members deserve to have that potential removed. I can easily find audio and video recordings of members, dead and gone, on the internet with advertising banners blazing away like an endorsement form the grave.

Courage in these matters isn't a matter of getting comfortable before confronting a problem it is confronting a problem despite fear and discomfort. The growth that results are amazing, I've been there.

Anonymous
anonymity

I agree that the tradition says "at the level of press, radio, and tv."
Some groups will not allow pictures to be taken of members in their meeting place. I think that is up to group conscience, or the individual person whose picture is being taken.
I remember seeing a photo in the Grapevine of a group in their meeting place. They were all lined up like a posed group...but each person held a paper plate in front of their face.
The only anonymity that I get to protect is mine.

noduis
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Joined: 2013-09-05
Re: Anonymity

Was the photo taken for publication? If not, no anonymity was broken. The Tradition is clear, we maintain our anonymity at the levell of press, radio, film and television.
AA isn't a secret society, although some mambers are so ashamed of their membership they try to make it one.

oscar
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Joined: 2014-01-07
Re: Anonymity

maintain our anonymity at the levell of press, radio, film and television.AA isn't a secret society, although some mambers are so ashamed of their membership they try to make it one.

Not everyone that has a problem with wanting to remain anonymous is ashamed of being a member, however,our fellow members should respect our privacy in such issues as taking souvenir pictures. Who knows where that particular photo will turn up??? Just plain bad taste to do that without giving others in attendance the opportunity to step away.

Anonymous
Re: Re: Anonymity

"Who knows where that particular photo will turn up??"
Good question. Do you? Does jodee? I don't. Why do you automatically assume the person who took the photo is going to publish it?
Just my personal opinion, but I doubt if the photographer is going to show it to anyone who doesn't already know the one who got the medallion and most if not all the rest in the picture.
Jodee and others seem quick to condemn the photographer without knowing if a crime has been committed or is intended.

Anonymous
Re: Anonymity

"quick to condemn the photographer without knowing if a crime has been committed or is intended."

To my knowledge breaking someone's anonymity is not against any law, furthermore I read a situation described, then asked for suggestions on a better way to handle it if the issue should present itself again. I can tell you where that picture will turn up. Anyplace film is developed. I'm proud to see some replies with helpful information instead of ridicule....Guess that person was having a bad day that should have been started over before flying off the handle. Just my opinion of course. I hope the days to come are better for them.
anonymous

Anonymous
sponsorship

The paradox I present to the challenge of quitting my relationship with alcohol, my physical, mental, and spiritual strengths. Along with my sponsors support, and the Reading of my Big Book. If I have the right idea there is no good or bad sponsor just someone I am comfortable with. And if they don't have the answers or offer the guidance strong enough for my maintenance, I get a new one. Is that about it?

lunchbunch
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Joined: 2013-01-08
Sponsorship

Basically, that's about it. One of my sponsors once told me that a baboon would have more perspective on my life and problems than me and that it was important to get out of my head and get some outside perspective on things.

There can be many aspects to this thing we call sponsorship.

When I was ready to work the steps, for example, I looked for a guy who had worked the steps and who used the steps in his daily life. That worked out great for me.

After years in AA, I tended to gravitate more to guys who remained active in AA and had developed full happy lives that included activities, career, marriage, family, community; guys who took the gift of sobriety and ran with it.

Anonymous
re sponsorship

there is a pamphlet for that http://www.aa.org/pdf/products/p-15_Q&AonSpon.pdf

my personal experience is this- yes there are bad sponsors. If you have not worked the steps, how can you sponsor someone else through the steps? it's like coming back from somewhere you have never gone.

Look around for someone who has had a spiritual experience through working the steps from the big book. if you can't find someone, the book was written to to guide you through the steps. read the book, when it says do this or that, do it. use it as a text book, not a story book. some may say to use the 12x12. read page 17 from the 12x12, the 12x 12 was written to compliment the big book, not replace it.

Anonymous
re sponsorship

Have you read the pamphlet Questions and answers on sponsorship? No need to re-invent the wheel.

Anonymous
sponsorship

Of course there are good and not so good sponsors. "You can't transmit what you haven't got" according to the Big Book. We are alcoholics not saints.
In the beginning it was hard to know what I just didn't want to hear and what was just not fitting. Even when I did want to hear, my thinking and reactions were off.
The other thing is that in our active addiction, we admired other alcohics and addicts. We are still more attracted to and comfortable with sick people while we are first trying to get well. I say we, because I was and have heard others say the same thing.
I really had to pray for the willingness to be teachable by whatever person that HP wanted to guide me. I had to pray to be led to the right person to guide me. When she showed up, I thought I was going to help her.;-D)

johnnys
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Joined: 2013-12-17
12 Steps

does AA have an alternative atheist and AA groups

lunchbunch
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Joined: 2013-01-08
Atheist & Alternative Groups

Well,you could say that every AA group is for atheists and alternatives since AA has no specific deity or required set of beliefs.

That said, there is a group in our town advertised as "Atheists, Agnostics and All Others". You might want to explore the meeting list for your area.

I have not been to our alternative meeting yet but know and respect many of the members. I find that my atheist and agnostic friends think and talk more about god and spiritual matters than anyone else I know.

I struggle with religion and with conventional definitions of "God" but love that I am free in AA to come to my own understanding of a Higher Power. I have found that as long as I am HONEST about my beliefs - OPEN MINDED that I could be wrong - and WILLING to listen to others and explore other options - I am safe & sober in AA.

clu1992
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Joined: 2012-05-30
athiest aa groups

I have heard of some wanting to start athiest groups. My question is why? about half the members of AA at one time were agnostics or athiest, why the need to separate?

The agnostic or athiest question is addressed entirely in step 2. you can read it in the big book, pages 44-57.

Normally I would say if you don't like the AA meetings where you live start your own, I did. however, I have to say it would be hard to have an AA meeting that the members don't work steps 2,3,5,6,7,11,& 12. If alcoholics could stay sober on steps 1,4,8,9,&10 we wouldn't have written all 12.
It might help if you read big book page 34. It talks about the person who can quit on a nonspiritual basis.

Glad you are here!

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