From the June 1973 magazine.

When Disclosure Is Right and Good

ANONYMITY

IN APRIL of 1971, I hit bottom. Added to the knowledge that I couldn't (still can't) drink, came the realization that by and of myself I couldn't quit. Fortunately, I knew where a local group of Alcoholics Anonymous held its meetings. One Tuesday evening found me walking in and saying to two men, "I think I'm an alcoholic." Before the meeting ended, I knew that I was (as I still am) an alcoholic and that these people had and would share a way of life designed to free me from having to drink. Since then, except when I'm out of town, Tuesday evenings are reserved for AA.

Our group meets in a portion of the basement of the church at which my family worships. On our meeting nights, there often are also meetings of the church council, of various committees, or even of the entire women's guild. Inevitably, church members met and greeted me on some Tuesday evenings. Rather than leave them curious about my presence, I decided to volunteer the fact that I was attending the AA meeting. Since word of this might have reached the pastor indirectly, I sought him out and told him of my new allegiance.

-- H. E. W.

Des Moines, Washington

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